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Priest's Zucchetto

( number of products: 4 )

Roman Catholic clerics wear a tiny silk skullcap called a zucchetto. The zucchetto hat, which evolved from the pileus, a close-fitting, brimless hat popular among Romans, has most likely been worn by religious authorities since the 13th century. The contemporary priest zucchetto is most typically made of silk or polyester cloth in Catholicism. Eight gores, or triangle panels, are linked at the edges to form a spherical skullcap in this style. The "stem," also referred to as stripes or stirpes, protrudes from the center point of the zucchetto. It's fashioned of a twisted silk cord loop that's supposed to make managing the zucchetto hat effortless.

As an insulator and to retain the shape of the priest zucchetto, the zucchetto customarily contains a lining of thin leather (chamois). There is a velvet strip within the trim to guarantee a secure and comfortable fit. A fabric lining is used in most modern zucchetto hat designs, and the current trend is to use an average synthetic material with a plain, natural textile inside. It can be worn with a cassock or liturgical garments. A zucchetto is usually worn below a biretta or miter, thus its other names of submission. The bishop is honored with amaranth and scarlet zucchetto, which are regarded as symbolic honors.

The zucchetto is worn during most of the Mass, then removed at the start of the Preface and reinstalled when the Blessed Sacrament is withdrawn at the end of Communion. Prelates are known to give their skullcaps to the faithful.

The color of the stole is determined by the wearer's rank: red for cardinals, white zucchetto for the Pope, violet for bishops, and black zucchetto for all others. A black zucchetto is considered a priest zucchetto and deacons can also wear it, however, its usage by priests in real practice is relatively rare, with the exception of abbots, and it is rarer among deacons.

A protonotary apostolic or canon used to wear a black zucchetto with crimson piping, but this is no longer permitted. Premonstratensian prelates wear a white zucchetto. Trappist monks also wear a brown zucchetto-like robe with a corresponding black skullcap, although this is normally a more substantial cap used for practical head-warming rather than as a decorative accouterment. At Ackermann Liturgical Vestments, you can find a variety of color options in our premium collection of zucchetto hats. Buy now!

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