Save to shopping list
Create a new shopping list

Roman Dalmatics for deacons

( number of products: 34 )

The Roman Catholic clergies use so many liturgical vestments. The Roman dalmatic is one of them.

What is the Roman dalmatic?

The dalmatic is a vestment worn over the alb by the deacon during Mass and bishops on special occasions such as coronations. The Roman dalmatic is a long, full, enclosed white garment with broad sleeves that falls to the knees or lower. The dalmatic was originally made of linen, cotton, wool, or silk and ornamented with colorful stripes across the cuffs of the sleeves and colorful vertical stripes (clavi) descending front and back from the shoulders. It is typically worn unguarded.

History of the Roman dalmatic

In 18th-century vestment fashion, the underside of the sleeves is slit so that the dalmatic becomes a mantle like a scapular with a head opening and two square portions of the cloth hanging from the shoulder over the upper arm. Modern dalmatics are longer and have closed sleeves with open sides below the sleeve. The vestment is distinguished by two vertical stripes that extend from the shoulder to the hem; according to Roman practice, these stripes are thin and occasionally joined at the bottom by two narrow cross-stripes.

In the latter half of the third century AD, dalmatics became the norm for upper-class women's clothing. It was a common article of clothing during the fourth century when liturgical vestments began to evolve separately. It was typically worn over a longer tunic by the upper classes and as the longest portion of the attire of men of lesser status.

Who wears the Roman dalmatic?

The Roman dalmatic is the appropriate vestment of a deacon at Mass, Holy Communion, or other Eucharistic celebrations such as baptism or marriage. Although it is uncommon, bishops may wear it over the alb and below the chasuble, in which case it is referred to as pontifical dalmatic.

It is an outer vestment, similar to the chasuble worn by priests and bishops, and typically matches the liturgical color of the day. To make a matched pair, the dalmatic is frequently fashioned of the same material and decorated as the chasuble. Matching chasuble, dalmatic, and tunicle vestment sets are included in traditional Solemn Mass vestment sets.

We care about your privacy

This page uses cookie files to provide its services in accordance to Cookies Usage Policy. You can determine conditions of storing or access to cookie files in your web browser.

Close
pixel