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Vestments for Advent Season

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The term "Advent" is derived from the Latin word adventus, which means "coming." As a result, Advent is connected with a sense of anticipation and expectation. Although it has come to be associated with Christmas, it was originally about Christ's second coming, and we have no idea when that will occur.

Advent represents both expectation and recollection, as we recall Jesus' first arrival in a manger in Bethlehem, which we commemorate at Christmas as a great event in our religion, second only to Easter. It is the period between 21 and 28 days before Christmas during which Catholics all across the world anticipate the birth of Jesus. The start of Advent is when the true Christmas preparations begin:

  • The festive food is planned.
  • Gifts are chosen and wrapped.
  • Songs are sung.
  • Cards are made and posted.
  • Houses are adorned.

Vestments for Advent

In the Roman Catholic Church, the color worn by a priest while performing Mass corresponds with the liturgical color of the season, which is the color that the Church has designated for a certain period or day on the Church's calendar. The colors of the priest's vestment - the outer gown, the chasuble, and other vestments, such as the stole, are mirrored throughout the Church. The Church now uses the colors black, green, red, purple, and white for its liturgical calendar, with rose as an optional sixth color. Each color has significant importance to the Church.

Purple is the color linked with Advent, which was formerly the color of royalty due to the high cost and scarcity of purple dye. As a result, the Advent liturgical color is a sign of anticipating the arrival of a King.

Purple also has a secondary meaning: it represents agony and suffering, making it a somber color. In this case, the purple color of Advent alludes to Jesus' death on the cross, which is commemorated at Easter.

Rose vestments are only worn twice a year, on the third Sunday of Advent and the fourth Sunday of Lent. This color is worn to represent Christ's joy and love. It is intended to remind Catholics of the joy of penance and devotion. The priest wears a purple, or rose-colored chasuble with a matching stole during Advent.

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